Over the past week, rainfall was below average in Munster and in most parts of Leinster, with rainfall amounts ranging between 30pc and 95pc of normal, according to Met Eireann.

However, it said most of Connacht and Ulster were wetter than normal, with rainfall around twice the norm or above in the northwest and along the north coast, but rainfall was a little below normal in east Ulster and in the far south of Connacht.

Over the next 7 days, our weather will be very mixed, with around normal rainfall expected along west and northwest coasts, but the bulk of the country is expected to be drier than normal, with rainfall amounts less than 60pc of normal in most parts and possibly only around 10pc of normal in south and southeast coastal areas.

Meanwhile, temperatures over the coming week will be variable.

It will be quite warm and humid up to and including Tuesday night and early Wednesday morning, but it will become cooler and fresher from later Wednesday.

Over the week as a whole, mean air temperatures will be close to normal, but up to a degree below normal in the east and 2 degrees below normal in the northwest. Soil temperatures will remain above normal in most parts.

Soil moisture deficits remain high in central and eastern parts of Munster and over much of the southern half of Leinster, (between 50 and 70 mm), leading to some restriction in growth and little or no change is expected in the coming week.

Teagasc has said that dairy farmers in drought effected area should identify any cows that are showing signs of heat (repeating) as it says the likelihood is that they are not in calf.

“If there is a feed deficit on farms, these cows should be culled to reduce demand for autumn grass and for winter feed. Farmers should scan early to identify empty cows and cull these cows where feed is scarce.

“Underperforming cows should also be culled to ease pressure on silage reserves,” it said.

However, Met Eireann says soil moisture deficits in Connacht, west Ulster and along the west Munster coast, as well as in the extreme southeast, are much lower, even below zero in parts of Ulster and Connacht, where some soils are becoming saturated.

Meanwhile, Met Eireann has also said that conditions conducive to spread of potato blight will occur over the rest of the weekend and at times on Monday and Tuesday.

Online Editors